Urban Nomads. Infrastructure for the Detached. 2017

Master Theses

This thesis project discloses how the interaction between the housing market, the emerging sharing economy, and more knowledge-based, mobile, and flexible work arrangements spatialises in new urban infrastructure such as co-living spaces. After discussing empirical as well as academic debates of the London housing market, it argues how co-living has emerged in response to named dynamics. Unlike co-housing schemes, which usually are of a non-profit and solidary character, co-living is an externally managed shared living scheme aiming for profit.

To give evidence this thesis project develops a co-living pattern language. Inspired by Christopher Alexander et al.’s Pattern Language (cf. 1977) and drawing on Grounded Theory Methodology (cf. Strauss; Corbin 1996) and Actor-Network-Theory (cf. Latour 2005) it uses the idea of patterns as a tool and method for analysing social processes, practices, and built environment of co-living. 74 patterns disclose spatial qualities, practices, actors, and discourses at a London co-living space housing more than 500 people.

Images

http://ud.hcu-hamburg.de/projects/master-theses/urban-nomads-infrastructure-for-the-detached-2017 http://ud.hcu-hamburg.de/projects/master-theses/urban-nomads-infrastructure-for-the-detached-2017 http://ud.hcu-hamburg.de/projects/master-theses/urban-nomads-infrastructure-for-the-detached-2017 http://ud.hcu-hamburg.de/projects/master-theses/urban-nomads-infrastructure-for-the-detached-2017

Information

Urban Design Thesis Project by Maximilian Bierbaum

Contributors

Prof. Dr. Monika Grubbauer

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History and Theory of the City

Dr. Anna Richter

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Post-doctoral Researcher